Author Topic: Why meditation is one of the most important things you can do for your body.  (Read 354 times)

Offline fodcom

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The Buddhists meditate pretty much all the time. I don't know much about their history, but I do know that they spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to control their impulses and their mind. Movements like NoFap and anything that abstains or restricts modern western impulses can learn a thing or two from some of the ancient styles of self-control. That being said, if you are already on the whole NoFap Abstain from evil spirit weaponry type deal, you could greatly benefit from meditation as it will allow your mind every morning to start off with like a cleared browser cache. You only need around 10-12 minutes to be honest, anything more is up to you. I usually go for 15 minutes as that hits the spot that I feel the most cleansed.

Meditation doesn't need any special rituals contrary to how a lot of it is being sold to suburban white moms and urbanites thinking they can change their life if they pop in their headphones and sit in a pretzel position for 2 minutes. You must do it in a spot that you feel you will not be distracted, whether that spot is the grass outside or the bathroom inside your house, just find one.

Start out with a simple easy position and work up to half lotus/full lotus. I'm currently stuck at half lotus and really want to move onto full lotus, so it provides you with a different from of mental exercise each time. Cross your legs, breathe and stretch while you do it if you want, eventually you just want to be able to sit still for a certain amount of time.

Good luck!
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Offline Mind Jelqer

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Currently experiencing the dark night of my soul and fucked up my head, but I guess I asked for this. I think I'm starting to get better. I want to get back on the horse. I recommend guided meditation if you are new or losing sight of why you even began. Meditation is a great tool, and it isn't meant to always be something that makes you feel good, but it can really put you on your back if you try to take yourself places you aren't ready to go to. I'm not sure if I was ready or not, but things have become much more difficult for me. I can barely even meditate anymore.

Offline cmdr_h

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meditation turned my focus into a laser that pierces through time and i like it!

Offline Lucid

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Not exactly meditation but a lot of people say this and Mindfulness Meditation go hand in hand. I've been practicing Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming techniques. I've gotten to the point where I'm able to remain conscious through hypnagogia (transitioning from reality to dream) and I've been able to form dreams around me consciously and enter them fully lucid. I highly recommend trying this out if you get the chance. It's like leaving your body and entering another world.

Offline fodcom

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Not exactly meditation but a lot of people say this and Mindfulness Meditation go hand in hand. I've been practicing Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming techniques. I've gotten to the point where I'm able to remain conscious through hypnagogia (transitioning from reality to dream) and I've been able to form dreams around me consciously and enter them fully lucid. I highly recommend trying this out if you get the chance. It's like leaving your body and entering another world.

That's really rad, that sounds like an experience to be noted and written down. Next time you do this, please write it down. Curious to see what happens.
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Offline ambianceur

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The Buddhists meditate pretty much all the time. I don't know much about their history, but I do know that they spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to control their impulses and their mind. Movements like NoFap and anything that abstains or restricts modern western impulses can learn a thing or two from some of the ancient styles of self-control. That being said, if you are already on the whole NoFap Abstain from evil spirit weaponry type deal, you could greatly benefit from meditation as it will allow your mind every morning to start off with like a cleared browser cache. You only need around 10-12 minutes to be honest, anything more is up to you. I usually go for 15 minutes as that hits the spot that I feel the most cleansed.

Meditation doesn't need any special rituals contrary to how a lot of it is being sold to suburban white moms and urbanites thinking they can change their life if they pop in their headphones and sit in a pretzel position for 2 minutes. You must do it in a spot that you feel you will not be distracted, whether that spot is the grass outside or the bathroom inside your house, just find one.

I'm a Buddhist formally trained in meditation, and what passes for Buddhist meditation in the U.S. (and presumably most other places on earth) is not just wrong, but often counter-productive. The American idea of meditation exemplified in your average guided meditation is some kind of Capitalistic amalgamation of quasi-Eastern plastic wisdom melted down with New Age spirituality that will only strap you down with the fetters of spiritual materialism. Living the same lifestyle of unexamined excess, but now spiraling further into it with the delusion of being on an upward trajectory of mental purification. My general word of warning is to be very careful where you source your information on your practice from, because you can just as easily be snared as you can be liberated.

A real fastpass to spiritual purity is practicing vipassana meditation to clear yourself of your impulses, then praying. It's a direct line straight into your unconscious and will reveal things to you that you could never find by either practice on its own

Offline fodcom

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The Buddhists meditate pretty much all the time. I don't know much about their history, but I do know that they spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to control their impulses and their mind. Movements like NoFap and anything that abstains or restricts modern western impulses can learn a thing or two from some of the ancient styles of self-control. That being said, if you are already on the whole NoFap Abstain from evil spirit weaponry type deal, you could greatly benefit from meditation as it will allow your mind every morning to start off with like a cleared browser cache. You only need around 10-12 minutes to be honest, anything more is up to you. I usually go for 15 minutes as that hits the spot that I feel the most cleansed.

Meditation doesn't need any special rituals contrary to how a lot of it is being sold to suburban white moms and urbanites thinking they can change their life if they pop in their headphones and sit in a pretzel position for 2 minutes. You must do it in a spot that you feel you will not be distracted, whether that spot is the grass outside or the bathroom inside your house, just find one.

I'm a Buddhist formally trained in meditation, and what passes for Buddhist meditation in the U.S. (and presumably most other places on earth) is not just wrong, but often counter-productive. The American idea of meditation exemplified in your average guided meditation is some kind of Capitalistic amalgamation of quasi-Eastern plastic wisdom melted down with New Age spirituality that will only strap you down with the fetters of spiritual materialism. Living the same lifestyle of unexamined excess, but now spiraling further into it with the delusion of being on an upward trajectory of mental purification. My general word of warning is to be very careful where you source your information on your practice from, because you can just as easily be snared as you can be liberated.

A real fastpass to spiritual purity is practicing vipassana meditation to clear yourself of your impulses, then praying. It's a direct line straight into your unconscious and will reveal things to you that you could never find by either practice on its own

Thanks for the advice. I knew there was atleast one person here that had more knowledge than me on this subject. What do you recommend for intermediates? I've been meditating for roughly a year now, just in silence no distractions, just non thinking, just sitting and breathing. Would you think that is the right way to go?
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Offline 100%SafeSpace

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A real fastpass to spiritual purity is practicing vipassana meditation to clear yourself of your impulses, then praying. It's a direct line straight into your unconscious and will reveal things to you that you could never find by either practice on its own

@ambiancer
Any advice on vipassana in general and/or what I should read/watch?
I read Mindfulness in Plain English and I've had some success but I struggle with concentration more than anything.
Been working at it about 25 mins a day for about 3 months.

Offline Mind Jelqer

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Not exactly meditation but a lot of people say this and Mindfulness Meditation go hand in hand. I've been practicing Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming techniques. I've gotten to the point where I'm able to remain conscious through hypnagogia (transitioning from reality to dream) and I've been able to form dreams around me consciously and enter them fully lucid. I highly recommend trying this out if you get the chance. It's like leaving your body and entering another world.

I haven't gone out of my way to practice lucid dreaming in nearly a decade, but I'm entering brief EMDR therapy course soon that you may like to look into. In its most bare form a therapist will slowly wave their fingers left to right several feet in front of you. You are supposed to track their fingers with your eyes. This eye movement induces a waking pseudo-REM state. During that time my therapist is essentially going to try to push my stress levels to their limits as a sort spiritual resilience training, asking me to relive traumatic events and talk about other things that make me uncomfortable in general. Right after I'm gonna hit the gym and try to lift hard. Anyway, I started goofing off with it alone before bed, just tracking my own fingers as I lay down. Not really focusing on anything or trying to have some sort of a breakthrough. I have been having the most vivid dreams.

Offline ambianceur

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The Buddhists meditate pretty much all the time. I don't know much about their history, but I do know that they spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to control their impulses and their mind. Movements like NoFap and anything that abstains or restricts modern western impulses can learn a thing or two from some of the ancient styles of self-control. That being said, if you are already on the whole NoFap Abstain from evil spirit weaponry type deal, you could greatly benefit from meditation as it will allow your mind every morning to start off with like a cleared browser cache. You only need around 10-12 minutes to be honest, anything more is up to you. I usually go for 15 minutes as that hits the spot that I feel the most cleansed.

Meditation doesn't need any special rituals contrary to how a lot of it is being sold to suburban white moms and urbanites thinking they can change their life if they pop in their headphones and sit in a pretzel position for 2 minutes. You must do it in a spot that you feel you will not be distracted, whether that spot is the grass outside or the bathroom inside your house, just find one.

I'm a Buddhist formally trained in meditation, and what passes for Buddhist meditation in the U.S. (and presumably most other places on earth) is not just wrong, but often counter-productive. The American idea of meditation exemplified in your average guided meditation is some kind of Capitalistic amalgamation of quasi-Eastern plastic wisdom melted down with New Age spirituality that will only strap you down with the fetters of spiritual materialism. Living the same lifestyle of unexamined excess, but now spiraling further into it with the delusion of being on an upward trajectory of mental purification. My general word of warning is to be very careful where you source your information on your practice from, because you can just as easily be snared as you can be liberated.

A real fastpass to spiritual purity is practicing vipassana meditation to clear yourself of your impulses, then praying. It's a direct line straight into your unconscious and will reveal things to you that you could never find by either practice on its own

Thanks for the advice. I knew there was atleast one person here that had more knowledge than me on this subject. What do you recommend for intermediates? I've been meditating for roughly a year now, just in silence no distractions, just non thinking, just sitting and breathing. Would you think that is the right way to go?

That's a difficult question to answer because once you've developed the fundamental techniques there's an infinite number of paths you can take depending on your reason for beginning meditation in the first place. What is it that you're looking to achieve?

A real fastpass to spiritual purity is practicing vipassana meditation to clear yourself of your impulses, then praying. It's a direct line straight into your unconscious and will reveal things to you that you could never find by either practice on its own

@ambiancer
Any advice on vipassana in general and/or what I should read/watch?
I read Mindfulness in Plain English and I've had some success but I struggle with concentration more than anything.
Been working at it about 25 mins a day for about 3 months.

Mindfulness in Plain English is a pretty solid introduction that I've recommended a few times, but I never liked the whole technique of focusing on the point of breath on your upper lip/under your nose that it recommends. In general anapanasati (breath mindfulness) is good for shorter term sessions but in my experience body scanning is a much more effective technique. I don't really have any books to recommend in terms of technique because I was taught it in person. If you have a local sangha or Buddhist monastery near you, they'll usually allow for guests to come and partake in their practice on particular days which is something I highly recommend. An important book if you're looking at meditation as a spiritual path is Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism by Chögyam Trungpa. Accesstoinsight.org is also a really essential resource for primary Buddhist texts and sutras if you're interested in Theravada. Not strictly about vipassana, but this text: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/gunaratana/wheel351.html is a great primer on understanding higher states of meditation and more importantly how to keep yourself from being distracted by the egocentric trappings of "higher states."

Concentration is 100% just putting in the hours, keeping your practice consistent, and knowing how to bring yourself back to concentration gently so that you don't develop avoidance. 25 minutes a day is pretty solid for where you're at though, so definitely keep that up

Offline 100%SafeSpace

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Appreciate it man, thanks :D
Particularly interested in Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, looks like an fascinating read.
I'll keep grinding and get those hours in!

Offline mrsterlock

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I use Sam Harris’s waking up app daily - strongly recommend whether you like Sam Harris or not.

He provides an actual context for progress within meditation - something I always lacked - but an additional element that has made me far more consistent.

Offline 0_-

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i've attended retreats hosted by Gnostic Teachings and they will be holding a meditation retreat at the end of June at the Padmasambhava Retreat Center. they are the only outside group ever allowed to use those grounds, which speaks to their reputation. they teach sacred sexuality, etc. their fundamentals are incredibly solid. no drugs, no boozing, eating right. all the foundations are solid so you can actually spiritually build something. They teach you how to practice on your own as really spirituality is not a group project. But to take your mind steam out of degenerate western civilization and situate yourself amongst people who have their foundations so healthy, knowing that you are amongst those who both reject degenerate culture and also aspire to become good meditators and spiritualists, well it is incredibly refreshing and highly recommended. It gives you lifelong hope. But if this is not a luxury you can avail to then they have most of their resources available for free on gnosticteachings.org
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"If thou wilt receive profit, read with humility, simplicity, and faith, and seek not at any time the fame of being learned."

https://inspirobot.me/mindfulnessmode

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